The 7 Utah Constitutional Amendments on the 2020 Ballot

September 25th, 2020|Action of the Week|0 Comments

Amendments to our state’s constitution can only pass by a vote of the legislature and the voters. The legislators have already voted, and now it’s up to Utah voters! Over the past two years, legislators have voted to place seven constitutional amendment questions on the ballot in November. What are they and what does a yes or no vote mean?

WHAT YOU CAN DO

  • Scroll down for information on each amendment
  • Join Action Utah for What’s On Your Ballot: 7 Constitutional Amendments. A Facebook Live event on September 30, at noon to find out what’s on your ballot so you can cast an informed vote come November 3
  • Click here to download this amendment chart so that you can print it out to use when you fill out your ballot.
Amendment A: Utah Gender-Neutral Constitutional Language Amendment

Should Utah use gender-neutral language in 6 sections of the state constitution to make them consistent with the other 231 sections?

Actual Amendment Language:

Shall the Utah Constitution be amended to:
change words that apply to a single gender (such as the word “men”) to words that are not limited to a single gender (such as the word “persons”)?

For ( ) Against ( )

Amendment B: Utah Legislator Qualifications Amendment

Should Utah clarify by when a legislator must meet qualifications (like age) to be eligible for office?

Actual Amendment Language:

Shall the Utah Constitution be amended to:
specify that certain requirements that a person must meet to be eligible for the office of senator or representative in the Utah Legislature apply at the time the person is elected or appointed?

For ( ) Against ( )

Amendment C: Remove Slavery As Punishment For a Crime From Constitution Amendment

Should Utah remove the exception in our constitution which makes slavery and servitude legal as a punishment for a crime?

Actual Amendment Language:

Shall the Utah Constitution be amended to:
make the following changes to the Utah Constitution’s ban on
slavery and involuntary servitude: remove the language that allows slavery and involuntary servitude as punishment for a crime; and
clarify that the ban does not affect the otherwise lawful administration of the criminal justice system?

For ( ) Against ( )

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Amendment D: Utah Municipal Water Resources Amendment

Should Utah municipalities be allowed to define a water service area to provide water outside municipal boundaries under certain conditions?

Actual Amendment Language:

Shall the Utah Constitution be amended to:
rewrite a provision relating to municipal water rights and sources of water supply; allow a municipality to define the boundary of the municipality’s water service area and to set the terms of water service for that area; state that a municipality is not prevented from: supplying water to water users outside the municipality’s boundary; or entering into a contract to supply water outside the municipality’s water service area if the water is more than what is needed for the municipality’s water service area; and modify the basis upon which a municipality is allowed to exchange water rights or sources of water
supply?

For ( ) Against ( )

Amendment E: Right to Hunt and Fish Amendment

Should the Utah Constitution establish a right to hunt and fish subject to certain regulations?

Actual Amendment Language:

Shall the Utah Constitution be amended to:
preserve the individual right to hunt and to fish, including the right to use traditional hunting and fishing methods subject to certain regulation; and establish public hunting and fishing as the preferred way of managing and controlling wildlife?

For ( ) Against ( )

Amendment F: Legislative Session Start Date Amendment

Should the Utah legislature be allowed to change the start date of the 45-day legislative session within the month of January by statute rather than by constitutional amendment?

Actual Amendment Language:

Shall the Utah Constitution be amended to:
change when annual general sessions of the Utah Legislature begin from the fourth Monday in January to a day in January designated by a law passed by the Utah Legislature; and exclude state holidays that are not also federal holidays from counting towards the maximum number of days of the Utah Legislature’s annual general sessions?

For ( ) Against ( )

Amendment G: Use Income and Property Tax Revenue To Support Children and Individuals With Disabilities Amendment

Should the constitutional earmark for education funding from income tax and other revenue sources be shared to also support children and people with a disability?

Actual Amendment Language:

Shall the Utah Constitution be amended to:
expand the uses of money the state receives from income taxes and intangible property taxes to include supporting children and supporting people with a disability?


For ( ) Against ( )

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